Framed Keepsakes

Some of my grandmother's handkerchiefs, which I had framed.
Some of my grandmother’s handkerchiefs, which I had framed.

When I purchased my first house, I decorated my entry way with a collage of framed objects from family members.   My maternal granddad’s lucky coin; three of my maternal grandmother’s handkerchiefs; my paternal grandfather’s tie; my great grandfather’s photo; my great grandmother’s tatted cap all served as wall décor, conversation starters, and as reminders of deceased family members.  I would rather have items that mean something to me framed and on display in my home than to have generic items and art.

I had my grandfather's lucky coin framed along with the swatch of fabric in which he wrapped it to carry in his pocket.
I had my grandfather’s lucky coin framed along with the swatch of fabric in which he wrapped it to carry in his pocket.

I also think that by framing these items and adding a small, engraved brass plate on the front or writing on the back to whom the objects belonged will help my heirs to know these are items to be kept.

A plate made by Aunt E in 1972.
A plate made by Aunt E in 1972.

 

Now that my mom, dad and favorite aunt have passed, I need to select defining items which represent them and frame those pieces.

For my dad, a long-time Ford dealer, I am choosing between his last car tag (with Price Ford, Lincoln, Mercury license plate frame), his 1976 personalized plate that says “Price,” or an old pencil drawing of him, dressed in his military uniform, in Korea.

A close-up of granddaddy's lucky coin.
A close-up of granddaddy’s lucky coin.

For my mom, a school librarian by trade, I always loved her small reading glasses.  I may frame those or her school service pins and lavaliers.

Then there is Aunt E, who was a wonderful teacher, artist and cook.  I am considering framing something she made, such as a crocheted collar or a vintage melamine plate.

An important part of framing heirlooms is to write the provenance on the back.
An important part of framing heirlooms is to write the provenance on the back.

I have shared before that a few years ago my sister and I were cleaning out an old storage building on our property and found several copies of vintage personalized Christmas cards from our family.  We each had one framed.  I enjoy mine so much that I leave it out all year long.  As I type this blog post, it is to the right of my computer monitor, proudly displayed in an antique, ten foot tall hutch.  Each tiny snowperson is bedecked in winter garb and sporting a sign of the season:  wreath, present, or holly corsage.

An old family Christmas card.
An old family Christmas card.

My “art” has no monetary value, but to me, it is priceless.    It is timeless, goes with any décor, and intriguing.  I will proudly display these items for many years to come.  They will probably be hanging on the wall of my room at the nursing home one day!

My great granddad.
My great granddad.

How do you enjoy your family mementos and heirlooms?

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